New Your Drug Rehab Centers

NewYorkStateFlag(1) New York City has long been home to numerous drug trafficking organizations. The city’s large, diverse, multi-class population creates a demand that these organizations are more than willing to serve. New York City also acts as the source for organizations that smuggle drugs to other East Coast destinations and to Canada and Europe.

Drug Enforcement Situation In New York

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New York City

New York City is one of the world’s financial capitals, presenting numerous options for the movement and laundering of drug proceeds. Private banking facilities, offshore banking, wire systems, shell corporations, and trade financing have been used to mask illegal activity. Money has also been laundered through currency exchange houses, stock brokerage houses, casinos, automobile dealerships, insurance companies, precious metal and gem dealers, and trading companies. Most recently, cyber-laundering and the emergence of e-cash provide an extremely expeditious means of moving large amounts of money. Additionally, numerous large scale money transportation and/or money laundering organizations are active in New York, servicing national and international drug organizations. These transportation/laundering organizations routinely conduct multi-hundred thousand dollar “pick ups” of drug cash from trafficking groups. The black market peso exchange and the “hawala” alternate remittance system are also used to move drug proceeds. Despite the extensive financial systems available in New York, many trafficking organizations opt to physically smuggle bulk cash out of the area and/or out of the United States.

In March 2007, Martin TREMBLAY, a Canadian national and former President and Managing Director of the Bahamas-based investigation firm Dominion Investments, Ltd, was sentenced to 48 months in prison for violating federal money-laundering laws by agreeing to launder hundreds of thousands of dollars of narcotics proceeds as part of a federal sting operation.

In November 2007, six individuals were arrested on charges that they conspired to import and distribute millions of dollars worth of counterfeit clothing bearing various urban and hip-hop-style designer labels. From August 2003 through November 2007, this counterfeit trafficking organization imported phony designer clothing from China, sold the clothing in the New York metropolitan area and elsewhere in the United States, and then laundered the proceeds from the illegal sales.

Drug Rehab News in New York

 

Photo of evidence seized at the conclusion of this investigation - $1,000,000 USC and 81 Pounds of Cocaine

NOV 6 — New York Drug Enforcement Administration Special Agent-In-Charge John P. Gilbride (DEA), Special Narcotics Prosecutor Bridget G. Brennan and Stamford Police Chief Brent Larrabee announced the arrests of three people in connection with a drug organization based in Stamford, Connecticut that distributed cocaine throughout New York City. Thirty seven kilograms of cocaine, 10 grams of marijuana and approximately $1,000,000 were seized during this investigation.

During the six-month investigation, agents identified Eduardo Taverez, Victor Marte and Harry Estevez as members of this drug distribution enterprise. On November 5, 2009 members of the New York Drug Enforcement Task Force DEA-Group T-21, Office of the Special Narcotics Prosecutor, DEA’s Bridgeport Resident Office and Stamford Police Department conducted an extensive surveillance on the defendants which led to the seizure of $1,000,000 U.S. Currency and 37 kilograms of cocaine which were found in 255 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Apt. C-4, Stamford, Connecticut.

In March 2007, Martin TREMBLAY, a Canadian national and former President and Managing Director of the Bahamas-based investigation firm Dominion Investments, Ltd, was sentenced to 48 months in prison for violating federal money-laundering laws by agreeing to launder hundreds of thousands of dollars of narcotics proceeds as part of a federal sting operation.

In November 2007, six individuals were arrested on charges that they conspired to import and distribute millions of dollars worth of counterfeit clothing bearing various urban and hip-hop-style designer labels. From August 2003 through November 2007, this counterfeit trafficking organization imported phony designer clothing from China, sold the clothing in the New York metropolitan area and elsewhere in the United States, and then laundered the proceeds from the illegal sales.